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Children's Advil Cold

Children aren't just small adults. It is especially important to remember this when giving medicines to children. Giving a child the wrong dose or a medicine that is not for children can have serious side effects.

The drug labels for prescription medicines have a section on "Pediatric Use." It says whether the medicine has been studied for its effects on children. It also tells you which age groups were studied. Some over-the-counter (OTC) medicines, like those that treat fever and pain, have been studied for effectiveness, safety, or dosing in children. But many other OTC medicines have not. It is important to read the labels carefully, to make sure that the medicine is right for your child.

Here are some other tips for giving medicine safely to your child:

  • Read and follow the label directions every time. Pay special attention to usage directions and warnings.
  • Watch out for problems. Contact your health care provider or pharmacist right away if
    • You notice any new symptoms or unexpected side effects in your child
    • The medicine doesn't appear to be working when you expect it to. For example, antibiotics may take a few days to start working, but a pain reliever usually starts working soon after your child takes it.
  • Know the abbreviations for the amounts of medicines:
    • Tablespoon (tbsp.)
    • Teaspoon (tsp.)
    • Milligram (mg.)
    • Milliliter (mL.)
    • Ounce (oz.)
  • Use the correct dosing device. If the label says two teaspoons and you're using a dosing cup with ounces only, don't try to guess how many teaspoons it would be. Get the proper measuring device. Don't substitute another item, such as a kitchen spoon.
  • Check with your health care provider or pharmacist before giving two medicines at the same time. That way, you can avoid a possible overdose or an unwanted interaction.
  • Follow age and weight limit recommendations. If the label says don't give to children under a certain age or weight, then don't do it.
  • Always use the child-resistant cap and re-lock the cap after each use. Also, keep all medicines out of the reach of children.
  • Ask your health care provider or pharmacist if you have any questions.

Food and Drug Administration

Children's Advil Cold FDA Approved Drugs

ADVIL COLD AND SINUS [IbuprofenC13H18O2 : Pseudoephedrine HydrochlorideC10H15NOClH]
OTC
-
200mg : 30mg (oral tablet)
eq 200mg free acid and potassium salt : 30mg (oral capsule)
PfizerSep 19, 1989
efficacy
5.0  (2)
side effects
0.0  (0)
danger
0.0  (0)

UNK

CHILDREN'S ADVIL COLD [IbuprofenC13H18O2 : Pseudoephedrine HydrochlorideC10H15NOClH]
OTC
-
100mg/5ml : 15mg/5ml (oral suspension)
PfizerApr 18, 2002
efficacy
0.0  (0)
side effects
0.0  (0)
danger
0.0  (0)

UNK

CHILDREN'S MOTRIN COLD [IbuprofenC13H18O2 : Pseudoephedrine HydrochlorideC10H15NOClH]
OTC
-
100mg/5ml : 15mg/5ml (oral suspension)
J And J Consumer IncAug 1, 2000
efficacy
0.0  (0)
side effects
0.0  (0)
danger
0.0  (0)

UNK

IBUPROFEN AND PSEUDOEPHEDRINE HYDROCHLORIDE [IbuprofenC13H18O2 : Pseudoephedrine HydrochlorideC10H15NOClH]
OTC
-
100mg/5ml : 15mg/5ml (oral suspension)
200mg : 30mg (oral tablet)
PerrigoNov 5, 2003
Contract PharmacalApr 8, 2002
Dr Reddys Labs LtdAug 14, 2006
efficacy
0.0  (0)
side effects
0.0  (0)
danger
0.0  (0)

UNK

IBUPROHM COLD AND SINUS [IbuprofenC13H18O2 : Pseudoephedrine HydrochlorideC10H15NOClH]
OTC
-
200mg : 30mg (oral tablet)
Ohm LabsApr 17, 2001
efficacy
0.0  (0)
side effects
0.0  (0)
danger
0.0  (0)

UNK

SINE-AID IB [IbuprofenC13H18O2 : Pseudoephedrine HydrochlorideC10H15NOClH]
OTC
-
200mg : 30mg (oral tablet)
J And J Consumer IncDec 31, 1992
efficacy
0.0  (0)
side effects
0.0  (0)
danger
0.0  (0)

UNK

WARNING: Consult a licensed physician in the appropriate field for medical treatment and drug prescription. Do not self medicate.